Classic Vedic & Hindu texts

Thirupalliyezhuchi | Thondaradipodi Āḻvār

Thirupalliyezhuchi by Thondaradipodi Āḻvār The Āḻvār, Śrī Thondar-adi-podi (dust of the feet of the devotees of the Lord), in these verses requests the Lord of Śrīraṅgam to awake from his Yoga Nidrā to bless all those gathered to receive his Darśan. With a fine description of the nature around Śrīraṅgam and a broad canvas of poetic imagery, the verses carry the refrain: O’ Śrī Raṅganātha...

Periya Thiruvandhadhi | Nammāḷvār

Periya Thiruvandhadhi is another work of the famous Vaishnava Āḻvār Nammāḷvār – one and probably the most popular of ancient Vaiṣṇavite saints. The present poem of Śrī Nammāḷvār consists of 87 verses and also forms a part of Nālāyira Divya Prabandham - also known as Drāviḍa Veda – consisting of 4000 verses altogether. Another, much longer poem of the same - Tiruvāymoḷi we could read...

Tiruppāvai of Āṇḍāḷ | Divya Prabandham

Here I continue to publish significant works of Drāviḍa Veda – Divya Prabandham – and this time – it is the work Tiruppāvai in 30 verses by an ancient Tamil saint – Śrī Āṇḍāḷ - the only female saint among the classical 12 Āḻvār saints of Śrī Vaiṣṇavism. The work itself in original Tamil transliterated text and English translation can be read on this current...

Tiruvāymoḷi of Śrī Nammāḷvār | Divya Prabandham

Tiruvāymoḷi of Śrī Nammāḷvār | Divya Prabandham. This work comprises of ten hundreds - centums or hundred decades, each of which is called a “Tiruvāymoḷi” which means “Inspired utterance” as well as “Divine speech”, the speech from the holy mouth of the Saint Nammāḷvār. Tiruvāymoḷi of Śrī Nammāḷvār is also a part of what is known as Collection of Works of ancient Vaiṣṇavite Āḻvārs or...

Shandilya Bhakti Sūtras

Śrī Śāṇḍilya is a great rishi of an ancient time. Śāṇḍilya's Bhakti Sūtras are numbering all total one hundred only but within this compass he has given an unambiguous Doctrine of unalloyed Bhakti and demons­trates that Bhakti is the unshakable attachment to the Supreme Godhead and that is the only way for one striving to become immortal, beatific and eternally blissful.” He says Jñāna is...

Mahā Nārāyaṇa Upanishad

Here you can read the Mahā Nārāyaṇa Upanishad; full text translated in English together with Romanized Sanskrit text and very detailed commentaries done by Swāmi Vimalānanda of Śrī Ramakrishna Math, done according to other historically significant commentaries on Mahā Nārāyaṇa Upanishad and Taittirīya Āraṇyaka and Brāhmaṇa, from which many mantras of Mahā Nārāyaṇa Upanishad have originated. Mahā Nārāyaṇa Upanishad belongs to Krishna Yajur Veda.

Śrīmad Bhāgavatam Purāṇa

The Bhāgavata Purāṇa (Devanagari: भागवतपुराण, also known as Śrīmad Bhāgavatam or Bhāgavata, literally meaning Divine-Eternal Tales of The Supreme Lord) is one of the Maha (Sanskrit: 'great') Purāṇic texts of Hinduism, with its focus on bhakti (religious devotion) to Supreme God Vishnu (Nārāyaṇa), primarily focusing on Krishna. The Bhagavata Purāṇa includes many stories well known in Hinduism, including the various avatars of Vishnu and the...

Vishnu Purana online

The Vishnu Purāṇa is one of the earliest of the eighteen major Purāṇas (“ancient stories”) revered by the Hindus. It is considered to be one of the most important Purāṇas and for this reason is referred to by the name Purāṇa-ratna, which means “Gem of Purāṇas.” Like some of the other Purāṇas, the Vishnu Purāṇa is presented in the form of a dialogue, in this...

Śrīmad Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa - an English translation of which you can read online following the links below – is the oldest Epic of the Hindu literature and philosophy, far more ancient as the famous Mahābhārata Epic, which is much later work. According to traditional narrative Rāmāyaṇa describes events which have taken place in the Tretā Yuga, second of the four eons (yugas) of Hindu chronology.

Śvetāśvatara Upanishad

The Śvetāśvatara Upanishad, which belongs to the Taittirīya or Black Yajur Veda, may be regarded as one of the authoritative Upanishads which form the source of the Vedanta philosophy. Its verses are quoted profusely in all Vedāntic treatises. The name seems to have been derived from the sage Śvetāśvatara, who, as we read at the end of the last chapter, imparted the Upanishad to a...